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Dodgenut64
07-31-2006, 01:20 AM
i was reading about the Dust Ya duster in a popular hot rodding artical. to qoute the artical it said "To feed the FAST EFI unit, Strope mated a 90 Corvette in-tank electric fuel pump to the stock Duster sending unit."
has anyone taken their factory tank and converted it into an in tank pump? im new to this fuel injection thing and any info about converting over my tank for fuel injection would be very helpful. ill be using a new 5.7 or 6.1 hemi with EFI .thanks

69 L88 Camaro
07-31-2006, 05:04 PM
The picture is perfect. EFI pump hanging on the sender mount with a return. Make sure you have a vent and that looks good. Size the pump per HP.

camcojb
07-31-2006, 05:39 PM
Also provide some sort of in-tank baffling or always keep the tank full. Without a baffle I could uncover the pickup easily with hard acceleration and even 1/2 tank of fuel or so.


Jody

67PTCAMARO
07-31-2006, 07:44 PM
I got bottom pick-up without baffles and driving it less than1/4 of tank and did not have problem. Maybe I did not accelerate/turn hard enough. In the event it runs out of fuel does it hurt bad enough?

camcojb
07-31-2006, 08:04 PM
I got bottom pick-up without baffles and driving it less than1/4 of tank and did not have problem. Maybe I did not accelerate/turn hard enough. In the event it runs out of fuel does it hurt bad enough?

With a carb if the pickup was uncovered briefly you still have the fuel in the bowls, so you'll likely not even notice. With EFI it's an immediate glitch which would cause a lean condition. I've had problems in a couple of cars without baffles, but these cars accelerated pretty hard.

Jody

67PTCAMARO
07-31-2006, 08:17 PM
What kind of damage that immidiate glitch would cause?

ahowudoin
07-31-2006, 09:38 PM
One thing that comes to mind first is the only thing that keeps that pump cool is the fuel.Keep running it low and it won't last.

camcojb
07-31-2006, 10:44 PM
What kind of damage that immidiate glitch would cause?

That would depend on the motor. On a forced induction/nitrous it could be deadly as leaning it out even temporarily is very bad. On a naturally aspirated engine it still isn't good and could cause damage.

Jody

Dodgenut64
08-01-2006, 01:16 AM
the pic above was from the artical. so a float or baffle is a must then? what does the float do? im green, real green at all this stuff.

McssGmachine
08-01-2006, 02:30 AM
I've experienced what jody is talking about! I have a stock Monte tank with a GN in tank fuel pump with no baffel's. When I go around corners with the tank low on fuel and get on the gas, it pops and hesitates alittle. And it pops on hard accelerations too, Something I definitly need to take care of!

Vince@MSperfab
08-07-2006, 02:32 AM
so a float or baffle is a must then? what does the float do? im green, real green at all this stuff.
Yes, it is a must. float is the tubular white object (near center of picture)...A baffle would be a shield or dam that is welded to the bottom of the tank or part of the unit itself, that basically retains fuel or keeps the fuel around the pick up screen (white object lower right corner as pictured) during acceleration,braking or turning.

MarkM66
08-07-2006, 11:46 AM
the pic above was from the artical. so a float or baffle is a must then? what does the float do? im green, real green at all this stuff.

Float tells your fuel gauge how much fuel is in the tank. So I guess it's not a must, if you're not worried about that, ;) .